CHN Connections

CHN Connections are a unique way to virtually share your experiences and connect with other CHNAlberta members.

Upcoming Connections are only available to current CHNA members. As part of your CHNAlberta membership, every few months you'll receive a CHN Connections by email where you'll have access to:

  • Link to a thought-provoking online video clip, audio file, news story or short paper about a timely topic relevant to community health nursing. 
  • A series of questions to help you Think through your thoughts and feelings about the video topic. 
  • An opportunity to Share your responses. Tell us what you thought about CHN Connections by emailing chnalberta@gmail.com. Consider talking about the subject of the video clip with family, friends, and colleagues. Share some, part, or all of your question responses with other CHNs.
  • Suggestions on ways to Act such as where to find additional resources, ways to have conversations with colleagues, and other opportunities. 

We encourage you to join us by participating in our CHN Connections. There is no time limit or due date and the activities are now open. Get ready to Link, Think, Share, Act around some of the most important issues facing CHNs today whether you're in public or home health. 

CHN Connections April 2017- The Opioid Crisis

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Opioid related overdoses and deaths are on the rise across Canada and all levels of government, health officials, and public health experts are seeking solutions to the opioid crisis. In 2016, 343 people died due to a drug overdose involving fentanyl in Alberta. 257 people died in 2015 due a drug overdose involving fentanyl. A multidisciplinary Urgent Opioid Response Team was established to implement new tools to address overdoses and deaths related to opioid use. The following priority areas were identified:

  • Preventing Overdose Deaths.Take-home Naloxone Program initiated.
  • Supervised Consumption Services. Support for organizations to seek exemption from the federal government.
  • Overdose Prevention. Opioid replacement therapy, promoting appropriate prescribing of opioids.
  • Public Awareness. Make opioid and fentanyl specific information available

All four priority areas involve Alberta community health nurses. As community health nurses we have the opportunity to learn more about the opioid crisis and what our role is in preventing opioid related overdoses and deaths. Some Registered Nurses are involved in the prescribing of the Naloxone Take-home kits and other harm reduction strategies. The Canadian Nurses Association has been active in advocating for changes to the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act to support harm reduction strategies. What can you do? 

Watch and listen to these clips:

Alberta considers radical new approach to battling fentanyl (Global News).

Alberta Health Services Addiction and Mental Health eLearning   (Listen and Learn, May 2015 - Fentanyl Awareness).

Safe injection sites up for debate (CBC Radio Edmonton).

Think

For many of you, the online video clip may have brought up thoughts and feelings. Here are some questions to consider:

1. What are your initial thoughts about the opioid crisis in Alberta? What are your thoughts on harm reduction strategies?

2. What questions do you have? What concerns, if any? Do you notice any assumptions you may have?

3. What does harm reduction mean to you? Do you implement harm reduction strategies into your practice? How does harm reduction strategies influence your practice?

4. What ethical considerations does harm reduction strategies bring forward? What obligation does a community health nurse have in supporting clients and their family facing opioid addiction?  

5. What can you do as a community health nurse to influence change? 

Share

Tell us what you thought about CHN Connections by emailing us.

Consider talking about the subject of the video clip with family, friends, and colleagues.

Share some, part, or all of your question responses with other CHNs.

Act

Here are some ideas on ways that you can take action as a CHN on this issue:

  * Forward CHN Connections to other CHNs within your networks.

  * Discuss this topic using the questions above or just talk about it with other CHNs.     

  * Access other resources such as:

 

 

CHN Connections October 2016- Evidence Informed Decision Making: Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness

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The development of public health policy is based on the best available scientific evidence, and the Influenza Immunization Policy is an example of evidence put into practice. In Canada, vaccines are strictly monitored for safety and effectiveness. The data collected on safety and effectiveness is reviewed and recommendations are given to develop or update the policy. The influenza vaccine is monitored globally with each influenza season for effectiveness, if the vaccine strains matches the circulating strain, and adverse events following immunizations. The influenza vaccines available year to year change with advancements in vaccine manufacturing and analysis of the available data. The objective of the influenza immunization program is to provide the best influenza vaccine to Albertans.

In June 2016, the Centers of Disease Control’s (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) released a recommendation that live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) (FluMist® Quadrivalent) not be used in the United States for the 2016-2017 influenza season. This decision was based on US vaccine effectiveness data collected from 2013 to 2016 showing low effectiveness for the past three years.

Following the media release from ACIP, other jurisdictions, including Canada, reviewed the available vaccine effectiveness data from the 2015-2016 season. The Canadian National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) revised its recommendation on the use of FluMist® in children. NACI reviewed the evidence for vaccine effectiveness of FluMist, including studies from the United States (US), United Kingdom (UK), Finland, the manufacture and the Canadian Sentinel Practitioner Surveillance.

The vaccine effectiveness study conducted by the US Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Network found vaccine effectiveness for FluMist® to be low to no effectiveness for the past three years, while the other studies reviewed showed an estimated effectiveness of around 46-58%, which is similar to the inactivated vaccine. Reasons for the discrepancy between studies has not been identified, however, biological reasons such as temperature stability, previous exposure to the virus strains included in the vaccine, and study methodology are being investigated.

Previously, NACI had preferentially recommended FluMist® for children 2-17 years of age who did not have contraindications to the vaccine. The data available at that time demonstrated evidence to support the preferential use in young children, under 6 years of age, with the evidence being weaker in older children.

Based on the current evidence showing majority of vaccine studies indicate that FluMist® is effective and not superior to inactivated influenza vaccine, NACI recommends its use, however, it is not preferentially recommended. Parents can be offered a choice in route of administration for children 2-17 years old.

Influenza Immunization Policy is updated annually and relies on the evidence available in determining what vaccine is best for Albertans.

 

VIEW the article here.

Think

For many of you, this resource may have brought up thoughts and feelings. Here are some questions to consider:

  1. In your experience, how does evidence impact your practice?
  2. How does this change to the influenza immunization policy affect your practice?
  3. What is considered in obtaining informed consent with this change?

Share

Tell us what you thought about CHN Connections by emailing chnalberta@gmail.com

Consider talking about the subject of the article and background with family, friends, and colleagues.

Share some, part, or all of your question responses with other CHNs.

Act

Here are some ideas on ways that you can take action as a CHN on this issue:

  * Forward CHN Connections to other CHNs within your networks.

  * Discuss this topic using the questions above or just talk about it with other CHNs.     

  * Access other resources such as: 

 

CHN Connections June 2016- Medical Assistance In Dying

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On February 6, 2015, the Supreme Court of Canada released a ruling on physician-assisted death. After examining the provisions in the Criminal Code of Canada making it illegal for any person to assist in the suicide of another, the court ruled that it interferes with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms Section 7, which protects personal autonomy and quality of life.
June 6, 2016 marked the deadline set out by the Supreme Court of Canada for the federal government to have legislative framework in place supporting the decision and then physician-assisted death will be legal in Canada for those meeting the criteria set out. 
This has created much dialogue and decision making by provincial and federal policy-makers as well as the regulatory boards for the multiple disciplines of health professionals affected by this ruling.
Many questions need to be answered for Community Health Nurses to understand what their role will be with medical assistance in dying. The Canadian Nurses Association and Canadian Nurses Protective Society are involved with the different levels of government ensuring nurses are being considered during the legislative and policy discussions. Questions that nurses are asking:

  • How will the criminal code clarify that medical assistance in dying (MAID) is not a criminal act?
  • Who will be able to provide assisted death or participate in the provision of MAID? Who will be able to receive MAID?
  • Will the ability of care providers to decline to participate in MAID on the basis of conscientious objection be specifically recognized in the new legislation?
  • Will the provision of assisted death be governed by federal or by provincial/territorial legislation?

VIEW the Online Video

Think

For many of you, the online video clip may have brought up thoughts and feelings. Here are some questions to consider:
1. What are your initial thoughts about medical assistance in dying, in general; as a medical professional?
2. What questions do you have? What concerns, if any?
3. What are your thoughts in providing care for a client/patient requesting medical assistance in their death? What barriers do you see for health professionals?

Share

Tell us what you thought about CHN Connections by emailing chnalberta@gmail.com

Consider talking about the subject of the video clip with family, friends, and colleagues.

Share some, part, or all of your question responses with other CHNs.

Act

Here are some ideas on ways that you can take action as a CHN on this issue:
  * Forward CHN Connections to other CHNs within your networks.
  * Discuss this topic using the questions above or just talk about it with other CHNs.     
  * Access other resources such as:

CHN Connections April 2016- Father Inclusive Care

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The following series of video clips are six short commercials produced to promote responsible fatherhood as part of the Alberta Fathers Involvement Initiative (AFII). The AFII proudly promotes engagement between fathers, grandfathers, uncles, brothers and any other man who is influencing a child. The initiative works on increasing the awareness of the important and vital role fathers play, and will assist fathers and service providers with resources and training.

Community Health Nurses have a unique opportunity to help support fathers in their role and foster an inclusive environment.

VIEW the Online Videos

Think

For many of you, the online video clip may have brought up thoughts and feelings. Here are some questions to consider:

1. What is the messaging in the videos? Why is it important? What does this mean to Community Health Nurses? What role can the Community Health Nurse have in line with this initiative?

2. Did you recognize any assumptions that you may have made?

3. How does your current work environment help support Fathers in their role? Is your work environment “Dad Friendly”? What is being done to include Fathers and help foster their role as a dad? What changes could be made to help Fathers feel welcome in your work environment? 

Share

Tell us what you thought about CHN Connections by emailing chnalberta@gmail.com

Consider talking about the subject of the video clip with family, friends, and colleagues.

Share some, part, or all of your question responses with other CHNs.

Act

Here are some ideas on ways that you can take action as a CHN on this issue:

  * Forward CHN Connections to other CHNs within your networks.

  * Discuss this topic using the questions above or just talk about it with other CHNs.

Learn more at:

  • Visit Father Involvement Initiative website
  • Follow the Alberta Father Involvement Initiative on Facebook and Twitter
  • Visit Father Involvement Research Alliance Website. Please note that FIRA is no longer an active entityThis website constitutes an electronic record of the activities and accomplishments of the Father Involvement Research Alliance, a Canadian research group that conducted a  Community-University Research Alliance project between January 2004 and December 2009.
  • Visit Dad Central Ontario
  • Visit Men Edmonton (ME) is a new movement working to empower men to speak out against violence and take on positive roles in the community. ME promotes and fosters healthy masculinity and healthy relationship.

CHN Connections October 2015- Gender Diversity

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The following video clip was made by prideHealth and features people discussing their lives and experiences to help increase our knowledge and understanding of gender identity.This video invites us to consider our assumptions and beliefs we may have about gender identity and the barriers to accessing health care.

VIEW the Online Video here

Think 

For many of you, the online video clip may have brought up thoughts and feelings. Here are some questions to consider:

1. What feelings did you experience immediately after watching this video clip? Where do you think these feelings come from (personal/professional experiences such as family of origin, religion, current family dynamics, conversations with friends or colleagues, nursing education, work setting, other)?

2. Did you recognize any assumptions that you may have made?

3. How does your current work environment help support individuals who identify as sexually or gender diverse access health care?

4. What can be done to remove the barrier for people and families who identify as sexually or gender diverse may experience accessing health care? At an individual practitioner level? Organization level? Health policy level?

Share

Tell us what you thought about CHN Connections by emailing chnalberta@shaw.ca

Consider talking about the subject of the video clip with family, friends, and colleagues.

Share some, part, or all of your question responses with other CHNs

Act 

Here are some ideas on ways that you can take action as a CHN on this issue:

* Forward CHN Connections to other CHNs within your networks.

* Discuss this topic using the questions above or just talk about it with other CHNs.

* Access other resources such as:

If you have any specific questions or concerns about CHN Connections, please email Collette Benbow, Online Education Coordinator at chnalberta@gmail.com

CHN Connections March 2015- Nursing Leadership

Link

The following motivating video clip, created by Ira-Joy Macaspac (2013), discusses the importance of nursing leadership and the capacity of all registered nurses to be leaders.

VIEW the Online Video here 

Think

For many of you, the online video clip may have brought up thoughts and feelings. Here are some questions to consider:

  1. When you think of leaders, who are the nurses you think of in your professional experience? Are they in a formal leadership position? Are they informal leaders? What attributes do you see in these people that make them either effective or ineffective leaders?
  2. How do you feel about nurses taking on more of a leadership role in their practice setting?
  3. Why do you think some nurses are reluctant to be leaders? What do you think are the barriers to being a nursing leader?
  4. What particular knowledge, skills, and attitudes would you need to develop in order to see yourself as a leader?

Share

Tell us what you thought about CHN Connections by emailing chnalberta@gmail.com

Consider talking about the subject of the video clip with family, friends, and colleagues.

Share some, part, or all of your question responses with other CHNs.

Act

Here are some ideas on ways that you can take action as a CHN on this issue:

* Forward CHN Connections to other CHNs within your networks.

* Discuss this topic using the questions above or just talk about it with other CHNs.

* Access other resources:

If you have any specific questions or concerns about CHN Connections, please send us your feedback at chnalberta@gmail.com